ACADEMIC WORKS

M.P. Nolan is part of an emerging field known as Persona Studies. Scholars in this field use interdisciplinary research in order to interrogate theories and practices related to perceptions and/or facades of the self. As a writer and poet, Nolan's focus is often on writerly identification or the poet-self, but she is also heavily interested in these ideas as they relate to detective fiction and student writers as well. This research has additionally led to a focus on the spaces between identities, fiction and reality, and various movements or ways of thinking. Recently, she has been working primarily with the works of modern poets in order to better understand the benefits of their methods of fragmentation or impersonal poetics in these terms. Thus, as an academic compositonist she primarily researches and practices Multigenre Writing.

 
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"THE SOCIALLY MOBILE FEMALE IN VICTORIAN AND NEO-VICTORIAN MYSTERIES"

Chapter in

Detection Across Borders

Summer 2020

Women in contemporary mysteries are the most flexible and mobile bodies, as a great deal hinges on their abilities to consciously and physically exist among the upper and lower classes and consistently blur or defy gender expectations in decidedly uncharacteristic ways.

Through historical, sociological and literary research, this paper examines the evolution of perceptions of social mobility for Victorian women in mysteries then and now in order to determine if these modern depictions are in-keeping with the original reasons for such border crossing, or if they are more indicative of a post-feminist culture re-envisioning the female’s role in society.

“MULTIPLICITY AND THE STUDENT WRITER:
EMBRACING CREATIVE MULTIGENRE IDENTITY WORK IN THE WRITING CLASSROOM”

Chapter in

Exquisite Corpse:

Art-Based Writing Practices in the Academy

2019

This collection draws from the processes and pedagogies of artists and designers to reconcile disparate discourses in rhetoric and composition pertaining to 3Ms (multimodal, multimedia, multigenre), multiliteracies, translingualism, and electracy.

"COMMANDER ADAM DALGLIESH"

Chapter in

100 Greatest Literary Detectives 

2018 

“If he’s as good a detective as he is a poet, he’s a dangerous man.” 

- A Taste of Death, P.D. James

It is his keen understanding of the subtlety of words that makes P.D. James’s Adam Dalgliesh both a remarkable detective and a well-respected poet. Some describe this character as Byronic, and this is an accurate portrayal, if only one-sided, as Dalgliesh is also unmistakably modern in his multiplicity.

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“LEARNING TO CIRCUMVENT THE LINGUAL LIMITATIONS OF THE WRITTEN SELF:
THE RHETORICAL BENEFITS OF POETIC FRAGMENTATION AND INTERNET 'CATFISHING'”

Article in

Persona Studies Journal 

2015

One of the most complex relationships we have to convey as humans is the written identification of that which we call the self. Despite the fact that we are multifaceted beings, contemporary lingual limitations often force the perception of the individual as a definitive entity through three fundamental normative communication standards: authority, authenticity and moral accountability. This essay examines the resulting paradoxes of writerly identity in relation to these constructs, and simultaneously proposes that the way to rectify such issues is to embrace disparate identity performances of writings past and present.

AT THE THRESHOLD OF SENSIBILITY:
THE PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE OF WRITERLY IDENTITY FRAGMENTATION

Doctoral Dissertation

St. John's University
2015

Expressions of written identity are compound amalgams, as the delicate balance between fictional and real often transcends corporeal standards in necessary and exciting ways— especially when a writer subverts the very conventions of his/her applied language. Therefore, this dissertation is an interdisciplinary, multigenre project that explores the terms of the writer’s own identity in relation to lingual constraints through a process referred to as fragmentation (or the act of depersonalizing the individual by dividing it into multiple entities), because it suggests that this process is essential to challenging the borders of the written self.

HUMANITIES REVIEW

Editor and Preface for

Humanities Review 
St. John's University 

2013

“Perceptions of Self in Society as Viewed through Literature and the Arts: A Deliberation on the Fundamental Unearthing of the Individual” St. John’s Humanities Review 11.1 (2013): 7 – 9.

FORTHCOMING WORKS

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​"REFRAMING THE PRINCIPLES OF WRITERLY IDENTITY WITH THE WORKS OF FERNANDO PESSOA AND OTHER MODERNIST POETS”

Chapter in

Approaches to Teaching Pessoa’s The Book of Disquiet

TBD

Forthcoming from Modern Language Association (MLA) Publications 2021/2022

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"ANNE PERRY"

Article in

Critical Survey of Detective Fiction, Second edition

TBD


Forthcoming from Palgrave 2020/2021

 

PAPER PRESENTATIONS

Recent Professional Conferences

March 26 - 28, 2020
Milwaukee, Wisconsin

COLLEGE COMPOSITION AND COMMUNICATION (CCCC)

"Meaning Making and Inclusive Pedagogies through Reflection, Fragmentation, and Improvisation"

January 9 - 12, 2020

Seattle, Washington

MODERN LANGUAGE ASSOCIATION (MLA)

"Writing Identity from Coast to Coast: Developing Self and Social Awareness through Creative Writing Pedagogy in Composition and/ or Literature"

November 8 - 9, 2019
Purchase College

SUNY COUNCIL ON WRITING (COW)

"Embracing Multigenre Identity Work in the Writing Classroom: The Creative Self in Society Project"

May 15 - 17 2019
Malaga, Spain

(NEO-)VICTORIAN ‘ORIENTATIONS’ IN
THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY CONFERENCE

"The Charitable and the Chastened: Perceptions of the Socially Mobile Female in Victorian Mysteries Then and Now"

 

©2020 by M.P. Nolan